InfoPeru.com EnglishEspañolNederlandsFrançais
19/11/2017 Comments   Contact   Sitemap   About

 

The InfoPeru's FAQ-page

Table of Contents

Phone numbers in Peru
Christmas customs of Peru
Does Cusco has a flag?
Train schedule and tickets to Machu Picchu
Where do i find an agency to do the four days Inca Trail?
How do i organize the 10-days Inca Trail?
Is Peru a dangerous country for the tourist?
When is the best time to visit Peru?
Do i have to take special health precautions before entering Peru?

Phone numbers in Peru

How do I find people in Peru? Are there a white or yellow pages available on-line?

Yes, it is easy to find people in Peru if you go to the website of the Peruvian Telefonica on http://www.telefonica.com.pe, you need to know a little Spanish to find your way though.

(Back to Top)

Christmas customs of Peru

I'm a Spanish student doing a report on Christmas customs of Peru - if you would be so kind as to tell me about the average Peruvian Christmas. Thank you

1) Do you exchange presents at all ??
Yes, we exchange presents between family members and special friends.

2) Do you put up any special decorations ??
We basically follow the USA customs (example: Saint Claus, etc, etc,)
At the home, we put a tree with lights and Christmas decorations. Also we put an little statues representing birth of Jesus (Joseph, Mary Virgin, three magic kings, Bethein's start and some animals and down the city).

In Lima - Peru, (the catholic people) we eat Turkey, "panetonne" (it's sweat bread. This custom is Italian), chocolate drink, mashed apple, salads, dry fruits, rice, mashed potatoes, etc.

In the other Peruvian cities, they have other customs, for example they eat "ponche" (is sweet drink), "buñuelos" (it's little sweat bread), pork, lamb, chicken and breads made in the own home.

On the Christmas Night (after 12 PM) of Dec. 24, all the family embrace each other and say "Merry Christmas", after we put a Jesus (statue) in his little bed and we begin to sign and pray, because he has just been born. After that, we open the presents and finally we eat. Also we play in the street with the artificial lights.

That's all.

3) Do you have any special Christmas songs that you sing ???
We sing the classical songs (Jingle bells, etc) and "Los Pastores de Belen", "Niño Manuelito" and other songs in Spanish.

Ceci (From Peru)

(Back to Top)

Does Cusco has a flag?

Could you tell me if Cusco has a flag? or what the Inca Empire flag was? I am trying to find out what area/civilization a rainbow flag would be for? Thanks, Trista Gage

Unfortunately i do not have a flag as example to put in attach for you, as far as now i never encountered one. Maybe i should make one myself one day because it is really simple. The flag is also called the rainbow flag and has the 8 main colors of the rainbow in horizontal lines from red to purple. If the flag is ready i will send you a copy.

The flag is still exposed all over the city of Cusco, even more than the national flag of Peru. In street festivals (and Cusco has a LOT of them) the flag is usually seen even more than usual.

(Back to Top)

Train schedule and tickets to Machu Picchu

where can i find a train schedule for Cusco to Machu Picchu and how to obtain tickets in advance?? thank you!!

It is clear to me you never went to Peru :=) There is a fixed schedule but as thing go wrong so often, the people around Cusco use to call this railway "the religious train", because only God knows when the train is going to arrive.

The first train starts of at 6h30 in the morning. Usually there are 6 trains every day to Machu Picchu and the same in the afternoon from Machu Picchu to the station of San Pedro in Cusco.

Tickets, this is another problem. The public company who run the trains do not sell tickets in advance. It is simply NOT possible to get any ticket not even the day before. What i used to do is getting there at 5h30, then you are one of the first in line (a line that gets very long around 6h30-7h30), so you don't have to stand in this damn' row. You can have a coffee afterwards in the bar of the railway station.

Good luck and leave your watch home :=))

(Back to Top)

Where do i find an agency to do the four days Inca Trail?

More than anything, I want to do the four day hike on the Inca Trail...how do I contact an agency?...when is the best time to do the trip? Oh, Happy Day!

Finding an agency will not be a problem at all. Look around the Plaza de Armas of Cusco, lot's of agencies can be found there and prices are sharp. Be shore to ask for anything that should be included and let them write ALL of this down on the "boleta" they will give you. Ask if food is included, if a carrier (chaski) is foreseen and if not how to get one (if you wish of course) and how much this will cost. Try to find one yourself, ask the guide that will be with the group and pay the chaski's yourself. Travel agencies pay them very poor, i think these poor people deserve more respect. Tickets of the train (way and back), the trail and Machu Picchu should be included. For more information you can read the gray boxes in the Inca Trail of InfoPeru.com.

Enjoy your trail,

(Back to Top)

How do i organize the 10-days Inca Trail?

I am really interested in trekking the 10-day Inca Trail and would like an idea of costs to have a guide plus cook and tents, etc provided. Nicole

To inform you about the Inca Trail it is best to contact Peru Gateway Travel who can help you getting the right contact person. She lives in Cusco and can give you the information you need to organize your wonderful trip on the trail. (She organized mine and it was wonderful!!)

(Back to Top)

Is Peru a dangerous country for the tourist?

In all handbooks about Peru there are warnings about theft and corruption. Is it really necessary to be a bit paranoid while visiting the country?

The answer is yes and no. It is true that it isn't smart put your stuff somewhere and leave it on its own if you want to go the toilet for example. Peru is a poor country and for sure, there are people who need more money just to feed the family and offer a bit of luxury. But violent theft is very rare these days. 10 years ago when Peru was terrorized by the Shining Path and other dark organizations, tourists were robbed more often and sometimes violently. But now the economy is running better, changes losing your money or stuff got a lot smaller.

Don't trust everybody you meet but don't be paranoia as well. There is a big difference between a Peruvian wanting to have a chat on the Plaza the Armas or a restaurant and somebody who wants to bring you somewhere in a dark bar in a lonely street. All travelers usually know this and are careful as a kind of natural reflex. In the two years i haven't been robbed once and i traveled everywhere alone and sometimes to the extreme. Nothing ever really happened that can be called dangerous. Avoid standing in crowdy places like for example getting on a bus. Be sure to have your seat and just wait until the other travelers are already on the bus.

Corruption is less together with theft. The government does a lot to protect the tourist and to purify their blamed name of the past. Police is still corrupt in the country but do leave tourist alone. If something might occur tell them to go together to the tourist police to find out what the problem is. If any doubt, contact your embassy. Of course, stay of drugs, prostitution or any other illegal activities as for example graffiti or making open fires in Natural Parks. Peruvian laws are no exception for the tourist.

There is more additional information about safety in facts for the visitors and here.

(Back to Top)

When is the best time to visit Peru?

Peru has a lot of different weather types because of the coast (desert), the Andes and the jungle. When is generally the best time to visit Peru?

Peru is near to the equator so winter and summer have another effect on this side of the planet. All year long it is relatively hot, except for the areas above 3.000m (la Cordillera or the Andes) where it can get pretty cold at night. The influence of the rainy and the dry season is another important factor to reckon with.

The coast doesn't know any wet season, except when "El Niño" is turning the weather upside down. In normal circumstance wintertime at the coast (May to September) has the only disadvantage of being cloudy and sometimes cold at night (because of the 99% of humidity). Rain is rare and limited to some drizzle. The low hanging clouds in and around Lima are called "garúa" and can get quiet greasy and mixed with smog.

In the Andes and the tropical rain forest (Selva) it is dry season and almost every day blue sky and sunshine. Take care of this altitude sun or in the rain forest, you’re sunburned before realizing it. Use a good sunblock. When it is wet season (from November to April) it can get very wet and rain for days in the Andes and the Selva. The rising moon causes usually a dryer weather. Think about this if you plan to do the Inca Trail or a trip in the jungle.

(Back to Top)

Do i have to take special health precautions before entering Peru?

In the Andes and at the coast there are no natural enemies or diseases. But you can encounter other difficulties. Before going to a country with a lower life standard than the western world, vaccinate yourself in your local hospital. No proof of any vaccination is requested entering the country. In the text underneath we’l speak about altitude sickness. In the end, who doesn’t make a misstep into the many abysses of the Andes should have one of the most exciting holidays of a lifetime and be back home healthy and full of stories.

Important to know is that some arias in Peru are situated on extreme heights. Cusco for example is situated at 3.400m and Puno at 3.800m. Most of us are not used to heights and if we don’t take care the first day(s), we can get very sick. Take your time and take it easy when you arrive. Don’t drink any alcohol but drink some cups of tee extracted from the leaves of the cocaplant instead or take some medicine. These are common in the Peruvian Andes and help reducing the negative effects of altitude sickness and stomach problems.

At 3.500m or higher the air is dry and thin. This makes your skin and especially the lips dehydrate. If you feel this coming, buy some cream or lipstick and save yourself from wetting your split lips every minute. The same can happen in the jungle, so prepare yourself. The Peruvian food is generally salty which prevents dehydration of the body. Have at least two litters of liquid a day (not only beer because you’ll have a terrible headache the next morning...)

(Back to Top)

 
©2017 InfoPeru
Best 1024 x 768
Top | Cities | Machu Picchu | Inti Ramyi | Inca Trail | Incas | Email | Sitemap | About
Since 16/08/2005
13317 visits
Help Send a comment:
Your name   
Your email   
Comment
Anti Spam ( Enter this anti-flood code )
                       

Page processed in 0.04 seconds